Coming and Going

By Linda Tancs

Archbishop Fulton Sheen said that the whole of Christian life comprises coming and going. In Christ, we’re first summoned to come to Him (Matthew 11:28). We’re meant to be united to Him (Isaiah 62:5). Then, through that union, we’re meant to go and make disciples of all the nations (Matthew 28:19). We spend much of our lives coming and going in the everyday sense. It’s often exhausting. There’s a different way of coming and going, and it’s exhilarating.

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As part of FOOT FORWARD MINISTRIES, Go Forward in Faith represents faith-based meditations for personal and professional growth. Learn more at goforwardinfaith.com. Follow us on Twitter @moveonfaith and join the Facebook group @goforwardinfaith.

 

 

We’re All Linked In

By Linda Tancs

English poet and clergyman John Donne famously said that no man is an island. That thought was echoed centuries later by John Henry Newman, first an Anglican priest and now a canonized Catholic cardinal. He said that we’re all links in a chain, a bond of connection between persons. Social networking sites have raised that to an art form, but its spiritual implications cannot be overstated. As Pope Benedict XVI brilliantly put it, no one sins alone and no one is saved alone. Every life spills into another, for better or worse. When we impact others favorably with our good works, we bring witness to the glory of God (Matthew 5:13-16). Conversely, bad company ruins good character (1 Corinthians 15:33). Be a guide, not a hindrance (Proverbs 27:17).

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As part of FOOT FORWARD MINISTRIES, Go Forward in Faith represents faith-based meditations for personal and professional growth. Learn more at goforwardinfaith.com. Follow us on Twitter @moveonfaith and join the Facebook group @goforwardinfaith.

 

 

 

We’re All Related

By Linda Tancs

There’s a beautiful Native American sculpture in Rapid City, South Dakota, entitled “We Are All Related.” It’s intended to represent hope for reconciliation, dignity and respect for the human race. I think it serves as a wonderful spiritual reminder that we are all part of God’s family, reconciled in Christ.

The Bible reminds us of our familial relationship in several places. For instance, John’s gospel states that believers in Christ earn the right to be called children of God (John 1:12). Although we may be separated geographically or culturally, we are not strangers or aliens but rather fellow citizens of God’s household (Ephesians 2:19-22). We were predestined for adoption (Ephesians 1:5), entitling us to call God our Father (Romans 8:15).

Outside familial bloodlines, are you able to see others as “relatives”? You may belong to a church where members regularly refer to each other as “brother” or “sister.” If so, how does it resonate with you? Do you leave the sentiment behind at the church door? Only through putting our spiritual inheritance into practice can we truly build a kingdom economy on earth (Matthew 6:10) that reconciles, dignifies and respects.

Life Outside the Box

By Linda Tancs

Sometimes life may feel like one giant closet organizer. There’s a box for hopes and dreams. A box where we shelve our concerns about money. A box for work. A box for relationships, past or present. You may even put God in a box, usually opened on Sunday for an hour or so.

Benjamin Franklin said, “A place for everything, everything in its place.” Well, that might work for closets, but living a box-like life is stifling—and unrealistic. Life is messy. It’s hard to compartmentalize feelings, actions or emotions. We’re not robots; we’re human beings created to be interdependent. Living inside the box fosters independence, isolation and self-sufficiency; living outside the box produces reliance and interdependence.

Interdependence is vital to Christian unity. The Scriptures remind us of its value in personal relationships (Genesis 2:24; 1 Timothy 5:8), teamwork (1 Peter 4:10) and character development (Philippians 2:3-4). Thinking outside the box is a business cliché. Living outside the box is a profundity.